Editor's Rating

[one_third]Peruvian-Food-v01[/one_third]

[one_third]Peruvian-Food-v02[/one_third]

[one_third_last]Peruvian-Food-v03[/one_third_last]

Strange at it sounds ‘hot and starchy’ is exactly how to describe Peru’s traditional cuisine because of these three major staples: corn, potatoes, and chili peppers almost always found in a traditional Peruvian recipe. Although highly influenced by centuries of Incan rule and then later by the immigration of both Asian and European cultures, Peruvian cuisine has still remained as traditional and native as it should be in cooking technique and ingredients.

Even in the influence of various cultures, Peruvian cuisine also takes much influence from its local geography and climate. So, although most Peruvian dishes are well-known throughout the country, many dishes are considered specialties in certain regions.

[one_half]

In Peru’s major coastal region, the Pacific Ocean plays a major role in by providing seafood and other aquatic resources for the country. One of the region’s popular dishes is known as ceviche, a dish made of mixed marinated raw fish or seafood and garnished with herbs.This is usually served as an appetizer.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]Peruvian-Food-v04[/one_half_last]

 

[one_half]Peruvian-Food-v5[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

The northern coast, on the other hand, differentiates in style due to theirnon-Andean influence, Spanish influence, African influence, and their warmer climate and larger geographical variety. A popular dish of the northern coast, especially in the areas of Cajamarca and Lambayeque, is seco de cabrito.It is mainly a goat stew cooked in a pot after having been marinated with chicha de joraor beer and other spices like coriander leaves and garlic.

[/one_half_last]

 

[one_half]

Now, hurrying to the plains and valleys of the Andes region, local dishes are based on corn, potatoes, a variety of tubers, indigenous animals like alpacas and guinea pigs, and imported livestock like sheep and swine.One traditional dish dating back to the times of the Incan Empire is olluquito con charqui. This dish is mainly made of olluco, yellowish tuber grown by pre-Inca populations. It looks similar to that of the colorful Andean potatoes but is crunchier when cooked. Olluquito con charquiis a mainly stew of diced ollucos with charqui pieces which is then served with white rice.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]Peruvian-Food-v6[/one_half_last]

[one_half]Peruvian-Food-v7[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Although the Amazonian region does not have its own specialty dish, it is home to a variety of wildlife. It houses many freshwater fish like the piranha (usedin many dishes), many wild animals like turtles, and various vegetation. Among these vegetation is the camucamufruit, which is a small berry-like fruit that grows in wet, tropical areas. The fruit is famous for its high vitamin C content.

[/one_half_last]

 

[one_half]

When it comes to desserts, Peru holds supreme to is,helados, or most commonly known as ice cream.Peruvian ice cream holds the traditional flavorsof vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry. However, it also presents the more exotic flavors like lucuma, camucamu, guaraná, and prickly pear. The most popular flavors of ice cream would be chocolate and vanilla. However, strawberry was knocked out of the popularity list by the more ‘nutty’ tasting lucuma.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]Peruvian-Food-v8[/one_half_last]

Tasty and exciting is all one could ever expect from Peru. It may have been colonized by many countries, but its traditions especially in their cuisine remain intact.